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  • Modern/Contemporary - Technically, contemporary design is rooted in the moment (as in this moment, here and now — how's that for having to think on your feet?). But in broad terms, it represents an about-face from the conventions of traditional decor. Less is more: smooth profiles instead of ornamentation, solid or subtly patterned fabrics in lieu of colorful prints, minimal accessories rather than big collections. While it doesn't have the overt warmth of older design styles, it won't cast a chill either.  You'll often hear the terms "contemporary" and "modern" tossed about interchangeably, but they're not exactly the same thing. Modern refers to a specific design movement that arose in the early 20th century and follows stricter guidelines; contemporary, by definition, is more fluid and tolerates a bit of rule-breaking. 
  • Traditional - From antique furnishings to floral-print fabrics, traditional style sometimes gets a bad rap as fusty and outdated. But that's missing the point. While it's true that this look takes its inspiration from the past, it's really about comfort. Every element feels familiar, properly placed and predictable — in a good way. 
  • Transitional - If Goldilocks were decorating a house, transitional style would check all of her "just right" boxes: not too cold, not too formal, not too fussy. It blends the comfort and warmth of traditional design with the clean profiles and understated colors of the contemporary look. - 
  • Rustic - Rustic style proves the old adage that everything comes full circle. Our pioneer ancestors would get a good laugh out of how fashionable the look is today — they probably dreamed of plastered walls instead of rough logs and carpets instead of bare plank floors. But thanks to rustic style's unpretentious roots, organic textures and shapes, and natural warmth, it's become as popular in the heart of the city as it is out in the woods. - 

All descriptions by Houzz.com